Skin city: 9th Annual Philly Naked Bike Ride circles Rittenhouse Square

Their web site says the “PNBR” is about: “Riding together to promote fuel conscious consumption, positive body image, and cycling advocacy.”

But the group also invites everyone to “Ride with us and bring your own message!”

I think this was my fifth time photographing the event.

I took this year’s pictures as the ride passed Rittenhouse Square.

I try to capture the weirdness without delivering too much information.

Read their FAQ for more info.

March illuminates opioid crisis

Hundreds participated in the March in Black along Kensington Avenue in Philadelphia to bring awareness to the crisis of opioid addiction in the city Thursday evening, also in recognition of International Overdose Awareness Day. More than 900 overdose deaths were recorded in the city during 2016 and this year’s total is expected to be hundreds higher.

Eclipsed in Philadelphia


I dropped by Dilworth Plaza just as the first eclipse of the social media generation was reaching it’s peak here in Center City Philadelphia today.

Before I left, I grabbed this angle looking past the statue of William Penn atop Philadelphia City Hall.

Thousands of people were out, many with eclipse glasses, homemade viewers, cameras, telescopes and contraptions of all sorts. I spotted this group grabbing a selfie.

Rizzo mural defaced, 1999

The Frank Rizzo mural in South Philadelphia has been vandalized for so long that I was still shooting film when I made these pictures as police were investigating an incident near the end of the last millennium.

According to my caption written that day in October, 1999: “It appeared that light bulbs, bottles, and Christmas ornaments full of paint were thrown at the mural.”

Rizzo was the mayor of the Philadelphia through most of the 1970s, had previously been police commissioner for about four years and his reign seems to have been remembered very differently by some groups than others.

Rizzo died while running for mayor once again in 1991, just a few months before I moved to Philadelphia but neither side can let him go, even though two-thirds of today’s residents were not yet born when he was first elected.

Recent local and national events have raised the question once again this week about what this mural — as well as a Frank Rizzo statue near city hall — mean to Philadelphians and if they should be removed.

But what if instead of focusing on symbolism, we could actually address the constantly simmering, sometimes steaming relationship between police and communities in Philadelphia?

Instead of endlessly investigating each other, defending themselves, vandalizing public art and arresting suspects, what if everyone could just sit down and agree to listen to each other for once?

Why can’t we focus on peacemaking instead of exacerbating a conflict which won’t be resolved with paint, eggs or handcuffs or by preserving, tearing down or compromising on depictions of a mayor who was born nearly 100 years ago?

I have never walked the walk of a police officer nor suffered police brutality, but my career in photojournalism offered me a pretty good look at both groups and it strikes me as idiotic to think that stirring the pot with no strategy for outcomes will lead us anywhere we want to go.

Most of us want peace. But we better get to work before someone gets hurt.

Vigil for Charlottesville

There have been several gatherings in Philadelphia since last week’s violence in Charlottesville. I caught this overhead look at a candlelight vigil Sunday night on Thomas Paine Plaza.

More Dilworth reflections

I have been having more fun lately with the reflections created just after they turn off the fountains on Dilworth Park, in front of Philadelphia City Hall:

The Clothespin reflects in water left by the fountains on Dilworth Park at Philadelphia City Hall just now:

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The reflections were almost perfect on Dilworth Park, outside Philadelphia City Hall earlier this evening:

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The Dilworth Park fountains were set on high when we walked through Monday evening:

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